eDiscovery 2020: Rewind on Day 1

The 9th Annual ASU-Arkfeld eDiscovery Law and Technology Conference kicked off its first day today, and was packed full of exciting and informative sessions. The eDiscovery conference focuses on the practical and emerging issues affecting the practice of law in the digital age.

Today, attendees sat through multiple concurrent and plenary sessions discussing these issues and were involved in the informative discussions afterward.
Starting the conference off, Keynote Joel Wallenstrom presented the first speech of the two day session, with his presentation “Do your Employees Trust You? Should They? Do you Care?” 

Wallenstrom is the CEO and President of Wickr and is a world-renowned security expert. He has led top white hat hacker teams responding to some of the most high profile incidents in the past decade. Wallenstrom discussed the impact end-to-end encryption can have on companies that have employees utilizing these apps. 

Other speakers throughout today include Michael Burg from Zillow and Aneesh Mehta from Microsoft, to discuss eWork and the platforms popping up promising to make our work lives easier. They discussed what to look for when adopting a new platform into your workplace as well as data storage for high ranking programs like Slack, Microsoft Teams and more.

If you were unable to make it to our eDiscovery conference stay tuned for our eDiscovery series, where we will dive into various panels and presentations we have at the conference this year.

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LSI Center Community Board Meeting Rewind

The annual LSI Community Board Meeting was last Thursday, March 5, where students, faculty and friends of the Center gathered to listen to various presentations discussing the research and projects that are pertinent to the science community. 

Yvonne Stevens discussed facial recognition technology, its uses, and the data security that comes with this updated identification system. In her presentation Stevens discussed that facial recognition can be used to identify suspects for law enforcement, retailers, social media, churches, casinos, etc. The possibilities for this technology is endless, with retailers discussing using this recognition to identify shoplifters and reactions to displays. But there are rising issues as well, Stevens mentioned that it could be unreliable and biased, bring in negative matches, and be used for decit. There is also little to none federal regulations for this technology as well. 

Brad Allenby presented on AI cognitive infrastructure, discussing the technology’s ability to process information, retain memory and much more. There are endless possibilities for uses for Artificial Intelligence, with problem solving, system integration, and much more on Allenby’s list of uses. Allenby also discussed the ecosystem of cognitive artificial intelligence, and how each section, data economy, institutional & services infrastructure and cognitive infrastructure, play into each ecosystem. 

 Also presenting, Kaylee Hoffner discussed the Soft Law Regulation of Artificial Intelligence. Working with Faculty Director Gary Marchant, Center Director Josh Abbott as well as Carlos Ignacio Gutierrez and Morgan Stevens, the team sought out to identify today’s soft AI law mechanism landscape. In their observations, they found that there were around 1400 soft law regulation documents/ mechanisms, and found 15 common themes identified and under review. These mechanisms identified were led by the government, private sector and non-profit participants. They also analyzed the mechanisms for enforceability and influence as well. Hoffner also identified the types of mechanisms found as well as the soft law themes. 

The Center for Law, Science and Innovation hosts many events and conferences, to keep up with our events follow our social media and blogs to see what’s next!

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Diana Bowman Featured on Panel for the Public-Private Partnership Conference and Expo

Dr. Diana Bowman spoke on a panel held during the Public Private Partnership Conference and Expo, held Tuesday March 3, 2020. Bowman spoke on the B. Regional Spotlight in Mobility Innovation (and Collaboration as the new form of Competition) Panel where they discussed the future of mobility and new forms of partnership that seek to make Phoenix the leaders in mobility across the U.S.  Through partnerships with Governor Ducey, the Arizona Commerce Authority, ASU and others, the greater Phoenix area is driving innovation as a smart region. Recently announcing funding to support Smart Highways and rural fiber deployment for long haul AV freight, as well as a focus on mobility innovation while involving a new approach to governance with public and private industries at the Connective. Wanting to clear a path for private sector partnerships and investment, Arizona is moving “at the speed of business” according to Governor Ducey. 
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Register for eDiscovery Before Early Bird Discount Ends

Don’t miss the Early Bird Discount for eDiscovery that will end February 25, 2020! The Ninth Annual ASU-Arkfeld eDiscovery, Law and Technology Conference will be held March 11-12, 2020 and will cover important practical and emerging issues affecting the practice of law in the digital age. 

This year we are featuring wonderful speakers like Hon. Joy Conti, a federal district judge for the Western District of Pennsylvania, and Joel Wallenstrom  CEO & President, Wickr and many more leaders in emerging technology.

Come be a part of this thriving, nationwide community of professionals learning and sharing how technology is dramatically changing the practice of law. 

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Marchant and Singleton discuss ASU-Arkfeld eDiscovery on AZ PBS

Gary Marchant and Robert Singleton appeared on AZ PBS to discuss the technical implications of growing technology and the ninth annual ASU-Arkfeld eDiscovery conference. The conference, held in March, will discuss the issues affecting the practice of law in the digital age. During their interview Marchant, faculty director of the Center for Law, Science and Innovation and Singleton, the co-chair and director of eDiscovery and data management for Squire Patton Boggs, discussed the vulnerabilities that arise when lawyers are not knowledgeable on developing technologies.
“Homeland security has warned that one of our biggest vulnerabilities is law firms themselves. Because law firms get a lot of this confidential information from their clients, and they are run by who? Lawyers..” Marchant said, “And so these law firms are incredible risks traditionally and they are now being hacked more and more because they don’t  have the right data security that maybe a big company might.”
The rise of personal data retention is also cause for privacy concerns as users are now generating way more data than before, something Marchant says lawyers need to take into account.

“We all are generating all of this data now, from all these different devices and technology: in our houses, in our cars, on our wrists, all of that now becomes fair game if you are involved in a lawsuit.” Marchant said, “Today now because people participate on social media and talk about what they are doing, their phones are tracking them and how fast they are moving. Now anybody involved in a lawsuit is gonna have data produced that is very private.”

Next month, the eDiscovery conference will bring in jurists, attorneys and technology experts from around the country to discuss these issues and bring in solutions.

“The conference is really driven by the fact that as technology is evolved the law has not kept up.” Singleton said, “So we are reaching out to practitioners to discuss the evolution of  technology, the impact it has on the law and how as lawyers, we need to keep up in our practices so that we are able to better advise our clients.”

To watch the episode of Arizona Horizon, click here

To sign up for the eDiscovery conference, click here

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Marchant elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Faculty Director Gary Marchant recently received the honor of becoming a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, after being elected in by his peers. AAAS has stated its mission to “advance science engineering and innovation throughout the world for the benefit of all people.” 

There were 443 honorees this year, across 24 categories, with Marchant selected to be one of eight fellows named in the Societal Impacts of Science and Engineering sector. “AAAS is the world’s largest scientific organization, so it’s a nice honor to be recognized by such a prestigious group,” Marchant said in his ASU Now interview.

Marchant has led the Center for more than 20 years, with ASU Law Dean Douglas Sylvester saying, “Professor Marchant is the reason ASU Law has been at the forefront of law, science and innovation. He has long been recognized as one of the preeminent scholars in his field, and this well-deserved recognition reflects that.

Learn more about Marchant’s work in his ASU Now interview here.

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Bowman Discusses How The Valley Evolved Into The Nation’s Largest Smart Region

Diana Bowman discussed The Collective to AZBigMedia, as well as how the Valley became the nation’s largest smart region. The connective infrastructure means that data and technology are utilized in the most efficient capacity and capability to improve and enhance the quality of life as well as economic development, etc. 

Bowman discussed the need for a smart system transportation system that allows a system that doesn’t stop a municipal boundaries. 

She says, “When I wake up in the morning, wake up in the City of Phoenix. When I go to work at the Tempe campus, I cross a jurisdictional border. Most citizens in Greater Phoenix cross-jurisdictional boundaries every day — whether they know it or not. To have smart system transportation that only operates in Tempe or Phoenix (independent of one another) makes no sense. Having an intra-operable system allows a seamless flow of vehicles and people.”

Talking about The Collective, Bowman says, “The Connective is meant to identify what the challenges are from a regional vantage point. This is not about ASU having a research agenda and going out to deliver technology to the cities and region because we think that’s what needed. It’s about each participating city telling us what they need and The Connective finding the best solution to address that need.”  

Read more about Bowman’s work with The Collective, as well as how smart city technology is being applied to the Valley here

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First Interest Group of 2020 Focused on Ethics in Human Gene Editing

Last week was the first installment of the Gene Editing Interest Group lunchtime talks. Speakers Timmy Lee, Adam Lunceford and Sara Selvaraj discussed ethics in human gene editing and the role that CRISPR is playing in the conversation. Recently CRISPR has been at the forefront of these discussions due to various cases worldwide of gene editing without an agreement on ethical standards when it comes to gene editing humans. 

Join us on Tuesday, February 18th for a discussion on Intellectual Property and Gene editing where A.J. Gilman, Miles DeCoster and Katelyn Hilde will share their thoughts on the matter, RSVP here.

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Workshop on the Governance of AI through Soft Law

On January 10th, 2020 the Center for Law, Science and Innovation hosted a workshop in ASU’s Washington DC’s office with 30 representatives from academia, the private sector, and non-profits to discuss the relationship between soft law and artificial intelligence (AI). This activity was funded by a grant from the Charles Koch Foundation.


The workshop’s objective was to examine the historical role of soft law in the governance of important issues in varied contexts such as: environmental policy, biotechnology, nanotechnology, and information and communication technologies.

This information provided participants with background information as to how soft law mechanisms have been used to complement the regulatory approaches to emerging technologies and informed their discussion on its relevance to AI.


Subsequently, the Center presented its project to compile existing soft law mechanisms directed at AI. This effort is aimed at understanding how government and non-government entities engage in soft law approaches to govern AI throughout the globe and in different industries. In May of 2020, participants will meet again, following the Governance of Emerging Technologies and Science, to examine the results of the compilation and share essays on current examples of the soft law governance of AI.

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LSI Center Hosting AI & Healthcare and Human Gene Editing Interest Groups

The Center For Law Science and Innovation is hosting two new series of lunch CLE programs this spring, AI and Healthcare and Human Gene editing. Starting next week, participants who RVSP can attend these lunchtime meetings for CLE credit, with talks scheduled to start at the law school noon in room 550.

RSVP here:

Questions? Please contact Josh Abbott at Josh.Abbott@asu.edu

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