Moving Beyond Animals: a Seminar on Non-Animal Research Methods

Amy Shelton of Shamar Advisors and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine will be hosting an event focusing on non-animal research methods and human-relevant research techniques. Starting January 31, various expert speakers will present on the non-animal research methods used in their specific industry. Due to the advances in 3D and in vitro modeling, there have been great improvements in human disease modeling, drug development, toxicology testing and more. With the advancements, scientists are now integrating human-relevant methods into research to produce more reliable results. This is by using tissues-on-chips, 3D bioprinting, organoids as well as other in vitro and in silico models. 

Kicking off the seminar will be a discussion on moving beyond animals with microphysiological systems and 3D Bioprinting, with speakers from Nortis Bio, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard. Topics for the rest of the seminar include re-evaluating the use of animal research for  bioengineering, in vitro and silico toxicity testing, as well as neuroscience and infectious diseases. Each event will be held at the end of the month until April. 

The events are open to all audiences, you can register here

Share on facebook
Share on email
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Governing Wicked Problems: Faculty Director Gary Marchant Speaks at Vanderbilt Law Review Symposium

Gary Marchant recently spoke at the Vanderbilt Law Review’s Symposium for Governing Wicked Problems last Friday. Vanderbilt Law Review defines wicked problems as the “opposite of hard but ordinary problems,” problems that can be solved by public and private governance institutions in a finite time period by applying standard techniques. Conventional governance processes fail to take on wicked problems, considering they may exacerbate situations by creating unwanted outcomes.

This symposium is designed to step back and look into whether there are general governance design principles that could prove to be helpful with wicked problems.
Thought leaders from a variety of fields were invited to write about substantive wicked problems and governance strategies to address problems. The symposium focus is not to run through each problem and its specific challenges, as well as considering governance strategies in the abstract, but instead focusing on the specific and the abstract. This symposium instead focuses on what generalizable insights have been learned to help design public and private governance regimes to manage wicked problems. 

Marchant was part of a group of nine speakers invited to this event, where he discussed evolving technologies on a panel with Yesha Yadav, who discussed financial system technologies.  

Share on facebook
Share on email
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Register Now: Autonomous Vehicle Symposium

Take a look into the future of mobility and learn how the Institute for Autonomous Mobility (IAM) is planning to make Arizona a leader in the development and testing of autonomous vehicle technology. This symposium, held November 14th, will highlight the autonomous vehicle sector in Chandler and the businesses who are contributing to its growth.

Panel discussions will cover safety, regulatory policy, implementation, technology, ethics, and the future of autonomous vehicles. Check out the collaborative innovation panel discussions on autonomous vehicles, highlighting and driving various partnerships and initiatives.

Register for free here

Share on facebook
Share on email
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

LSI Scholar Profile: Dallin Robinson

The Center is home to an incredible faculty and host to the top minds at the intersection of law, science, and technology. But we also attract the brightest student scholars around; you should meet them.

Class year: 3L (2020 grad)
Hometown: St. Louis, Missouri

Undergrad info: B.A. in Philosophy from Brigham Young University

Fun facts: 

  • I’m an adrenaline junkie.
  • I ride bulls at amateur rodeos (4.3 seconds is my best time) and I often road trip to Utah ski resorts.
  • I’ve played guitar for about ten years. My idols are Page, Hendrix, the Three Kings (B.B., Albert, and Freddie), and Stevie Ray Vaughan. 
  • I recently restored a late-1970s Marantz record player and have begun a record collection of my own. I’m convinced that everything sounds better on vinyl.
I met my wife while I was in the last year of my undergrad. We’ve been married for about two and a half years and we’re expecting our first child in May 2020. I came to law school to explore the intersection of the law with emerging technologies, so I was thrilled to be selected as one of the LSI Center Scholars. I’m a soon-to-be-published author with the Richmond Journal of Law and Technology. That article, which combines economic theory with antitrust, class action, and consumer protection law, will be published later this fall. I also recently co-authored a paper on planned obsolescence for a professor of the ASU School of Design which was just presented at an international conference on product lifecycles and sustainability in Berlin. I’m spending my last year of law school taking practical classes and mentoring 2Ls in my capacity as one of the Senior Note and Comment Editors of Jurimetrics. Once I pass the Bar, I’ll clerk for Judge Samuel Anderson Thumma of the Arizona Court of Appeals and hopefully end up working for a plaintiffs’ class action firm, or in the consumer protection division of the Arizona Attorney General’s office, or for the FTC.
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

LSI Scholar Profile: Asha Devineni

The Center is home to an incredible faculty and host to the top minds at the intersection of law, science, and technology. But we also attract the brightest student scholars around; you should meet them.

Hometown:

Gilbert, AZ
Undergrad/Education:

BS in the Science of Health Care Delivery (College of Health Solutions) & graduate of Barrett, the Honors College at ASU.

Honors Thesis: Identifying Barriers to Care Coordination for Children with Special Health Care Needs: Provider Perspectives. Certificate in Health Care Ethics.

Fun Facts:

  • She is bilingual.
  • She worked on creating an app, KYA, designed to be a safe space to promote social health for girls and women.
  • She studied abroad in India and London.

Asha says: 

I graduated from ASU in 2018 with a BS in the Science of Health Care Delivery, so I’m a double devil! In undergrad, I had the privilege of working on health policy projects assessing pediatric asthma clusters and breast cancer disparities in women of color. Working on those projects is what initially sparked my interest in the legal aspects of health care. I’m particularly interested in how the law can be used to address social determinants of health. I spent the last seven months of undergrad working at AHCCCS, Arizona’s Medicaid agency, which fueled my interest in developing policies that best serve the needs of vulnerable populations. Medicare and Medicaid can be confusing pieces of legislation that may be cumbersome to comply with, but I hope to bridge the gap between the medical and legal worlds. While it is important for everyone to understand the legal and medical worlds, medicolegal information is increasingly complex. I’m passionate about communicating that kind of information in an accessible way so individuals are empowered to make informed decisions. I’m particularly interested in how creating Medical Legal Partnerships could further the Triple Aim goals to improve health outcomes, improve individual experiences of care, and reduce costs/inefficiencies. After law school, I hope to return to the health policy space–whether that’s in the public or private sector.

Share on facebook
Share on email
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Blockchain: An ASU Law Student’s Guide for State Legislators

Many state legislatures are considering blockchain legislation as it has been expanding to new markets increasingly. Maria Hodge, an ASU Law student,  has created a guide for state legislatures to use for information as many are hoping to capitalize on the potential economic gains by allowing the technology to be implemented within their states. Twenty-four states and Puerto Rico have enacted a bill on this technology. The rate of proposed legislation on blockchain has been increasing rapidly. Fifteen states introduced legislation last year, a big step from the six states who did in 2017. 

Congress is actively considering blockchain regulation, through various bills that, if enacted, could establish a working group to evaluate the application of blockchain in some federal agencies. States have strong reasons economically to lead in this area.

Hodge complied a number of questions  that could help aide law and policymakers in this area of law and technology. 

What is blockchain? Blockchain was first developed after the 2008 financial crisis, providing a means for achieving secure financial transactions through the exchange of cryptocurrency. Blockchain’s sole use is no longer cryptocurrency, but still the biggest. Blockchain technology has expanded rapidly in the past decade, now being used for various markets in the private sector. Financial transactions, record keeping, contract formation, and secure messaging are some of the uses that blockchain has expanded into. Public Sector adaptations of the blockchain technology is slower, but applications of this technology have been seen for digital voting, real estate, and public health surveillance activities. 

The foundation of blockchain is a “decentralized database,” a network of computers that individually verify the authenticity of information. The documents or records within the blockchain are never edited, only added to, and a new change in the record gets connected to the prior record after being verified as an authentic transaction. 

What does blockchain legislation cover? State legislations typically addresses blockchain in four various ways.

  • A bill can create a blockchain task force, working group or subcommittee to better understand the technology and how it can be best utilized within the state.

States that have legislatively created task forces to study blockchain technology: California, Wyoming, Vermont, Illinois, New Jersey and Connecticut.

  • A bill can define blockchain or incorporate relevant terminology into existing statutory frameworks. This can be used to ensure that unwritten or electronically signed documents contained within the network are recognized under state law.

States with this legislation: Arizona, Vermont. 

  • A bill can preempt or restrict local regulations of blockchain to encourage further development of the technology within the state.

This type of legislation can be found in: Arizona, Illinois and Nevada. 

  • A bill can encourage the adoption of blockchain technology in certain industries or government agencies. This can be used to increase efficiency and security and reduce costs for state government.

States with this legislation: Delaware, Illinois, and Nebraska. 

What are ways to mitigate possible harms caused by legislating on blockchain? Technology legislation typically becomes obsolete after a few years due to the rapid rate of development in the industry. This can make it hard for legislatures to keep up with the changing landscape.

Some ways to avoid this issue:

  • Blockchain legislation should include uniform language and address the technology in broad terms. Generalized language is important in maintaining the law’s relevancy since blockchain itself is rapidly developing and highly variable depending on its application. 
  • Legislators can incorporate sunset provisions into their bill that either nullifies the bill after a period of time or allows the legislature to renew or revise the bill. 
  • Legislators can incorporate accountability schemes into their bills to ensure that the legislation is applied correctly and reaching the intended result. 

For an extensive look at blockchain, check out Maria Hodge’s article here

Share on facebook
Share on email
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

LSI Center Scholar: Cristina Ribble

The Center is home to an incredible faculty and host to the top minds at the intersection of law, science, and technology. But we also attract the brightest student scholars around; you should meet them.
 

Class year – 2L

Hometown – Scottsdale

Undergrad/Grad Education Info
University of Alabama Honors College, Bachelor of Arts and Sciences in Psychology and Biology (Pre-Med Track).

Fun Facts
– I have been to as many countries as I am years old (23)
– My favorite food is pasta (any kind of pasta)
– I really love pickles.

For almost all of undergrad, Cristina’s plan was to go to medical school, but after  realizing she would probably would never get over her fear of blood, she searched for other professions that would challenge her and let her use her science background — then she found intellectual property law. She enrolled in law school and has loved her time there so far. Right now she is working as Legal Research Aid for a Patent Licensing treatise, part-time as a patent examiner, Law Ambassador, and just made the Saul Lefkowitz Trademark Moot Court team. Her current legal focus is IP litigation, specifically patent litigation.

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Report on Fuel Consumption Co-Authored by Faculty Director Gary Marchant Released

A report on the Fuel Consumption in Medium and Heavy-Duty Vehicles by the The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has recently been released. Faculty Director Gary Marchant co-authored this report discussing how the regulation of natural gas vehicles and trailer modifications can be a strategy to reduce fuel consumption in medium and heavy-duty vehicles.

This report follows a 2010 Research Council report whose findings and recommendations helped shape the “Phase I Rule” issued by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Since the introduction of the Phase I Rule, the emergence of natural gas as a transportation fuel is significant. The low carbon content, the greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas are lower than for gasoline or diesel fuel. This benefit is somewhat negated, though, by the lower efficiency in engines currently available and could be offset by methane increasing greenhouse gas effects. Natural gas fueling infrastructure is also undeveloped and will require large investments to prevent disruption in routes and travel times for long-haul trucks.

There are, however, a number of strategies that do not involve changes to the engine or vehicle and are also available for reducing fuel consumption. Changes to fleet operations and logistics, innovations in infrastructure, traffic management as well as driver training and behavioral initiatives could help reduce consumption.

Find the report here.

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

LSI Center Scholar Profile: Trent Hoffman

The Center is home to an incredible faculty and host to the top minds at the intersection of law, science, and technology. But we also attract the brightest student scholars around; you should meet them.

Class year:

Class of 2021

Hometown:

Chandler, Arizona

Undergrad/Grad Education:

  • B.S.E. Aerospace Engineering (Aeronautics), Arizona State University
  • M.S. Electrical Engineering, Arizona State

Fun Facts:

  • Is an avid outdoorsman.
  • Lived in Mozambique, Africa for two years where he learned to speak fluent Portuguese
  • Trent & his wife, Kelsey, have a three-year-old son named Porter and a two-month-old daughter named Ruby.
  • Once played the drums in a band at the high school prom.
Trent obtained an undergraduate degree in Aerospace Engineering from Arizona State University where he worked as an undergraduate intern with the Environmental Remote Sensing Group focusing on wind energy and atmospheric studies using Doppler LiDAR. After completing his undergraduate degree, he completed a Master’s Degree in Electrical Engineering at Arizona State University and began working for Snell & Wilmer as a patent agent. His current practice is focused mainly on patent preparation and prosecution in the fields of composite materials, ceramics, renewable/sustainable technologies, aerospace systems, engines, nacelles, landing gear, aircraft wheels and brakes, and electrical power generation and control. He currently serves as a 2L Representative on the Board of the Intellectual Property Student Association (IPSA). He hopes to continue developing his strong interest in engineering and Intellectual Property and Patent Law through the Center for Law, Science and Innovation.
Share on facebook
Share on email
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Italian Study Abroad Program Offers Law Students Valuable Experiences

A view students in the program came to enjoy in Prato, Italy.

In a partnership with Monash Law School of Melbourne, Australia, the study program sends students to Prato, Italy, where Monash Law School has a campus. ASU Law’s Associate Dean for International Engagement, Diana Bowman,  oversees the program and emphasizes the benefits of a study program like this.

“Our students are provided with an opportunity to study with leading scholars and practitioners from around the world that they wouldn’t otherwise have access to,” Bowman said, “while simultaneously building relationships and networks with other law students from around the world.”

Classes in this innovative program are taught in English and cover topics on international refugee law, international criminal justice, comparative European legal systems, and more. The program also gives students the opportunity to build a network of colleagues all around the globe, something that could be very valuable later on. The short schedule of the study program also leaves time for externships, which every law student must complete, making the program more accessible to those who haven’t completed their externship yet. The program also increases a student’s chances for employment, with the connections and experience gained during the stay.

 

To learn more about the program, click here.

Share on facebook
Share on email
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment