2014 EBOLA OUTBREAK: Issues of Law, Policy and Ethics

SPECIAL PRESENTATION: TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2014, 12:15-1:15PM.

ARMSTRONG HALL | GREAT HALL

SANDRA DAY O’CONNOR COLLEGE OF LAW

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY – TEMPE CAMPUS

FEATURING: JAMES G. HODGE, JR., J.D., L.L.M. (ASSOCIATE DEAN AND PROFESSOR OF LAW, SANDRA DAY O’CONNOR COLLEGE OF LAW) AND DAVID H. BEYDA, M.D., (CHAIR AND PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF BIOETHICS AND MEDICAL HUMANISM, UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE).

ON-SITE ATTENDANCE OR WEBSTREAM ACCESS

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW TO REGISTER:

Ebola

 

Wednesday Web Watch for September 17, 2014

redOrbit‘s Eric Hopton reports that MIT (supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)), employing a calculated force-based approach, has developed an algorithm giving a robot cheetah the “muscle power” to mimic the leaps & bounds of its living counterpart.  While still a bit slow, clocking in at 10 MPH, the confident research team foresees a future speed of 30 MPH – which is still 30 MPH short of a cheetah’s speed in the wild.  A purr-worthy success, nonetheless.

Tuesday Triple Trivia Tease for September 16, 2014

3 Questions. 3 Hints. 3 Answers.  Every Tuesday.

1. Forget upgrading to the iPhone 6.  Save your bucks and you might be part of the elite few eligible for this type of upgrade…

Hint:

Answer: the argument that upgrades, generally, are only available to the economically privileged is not new, however, could the gap be widening even more?  According to some experts, we may soon be witness to the performance evolution revolution, that enhances, rather than corrects, human functions.  A few years ago, many people turned to elective plastic surgery procedures simply to enhance their natural appearance (this category is distinguished from trauma-related or medically-advised plastic surgeries).  These folks had the discretionary funds to pay a surgeon to nip, tuck or insert the desired, yet medically unnecessary, effect.  Now we may be on the cusp of an era when some upgraded individuals (the wealthy) will be “biologically better than the rest” (the poor).  However, not all agree that such opportunities will further contribute to a social split, and claim that biological enhancements will be culture-driven rather than independently & financially driven.  Read the details here.

2. How many smart devices will be in homes by 2022?

Hint: think of a standard stock market index…

Answer: it’s yet another revolution: the estimate is that seven to eight years from now, the typical home may contain 500 or so smart devices.  It’s all about connections between just about everything, from the smallest gadget & product to the largest.  So, your future fridge will likely be able to connect to your mobile phone to perhaps tell you it is running low on milk.  No more 3M post-it notes necessary.   Read more about companies & products involved in the “Internet of Things” here.

3. Technology seems to be in charge just about everywhere.  However, one recent and ongoing catastrophe is proving to the world that, in this particular forum, Mother Nature is in full charge…

Hint:

Answer: the Ebola virus has shown it is a force to be reckoned with and, so far, it is winning the battle.  Given the number of cases, it has the potential to spread to other continents and even worse, mutate in such a fashion that it becomes transmissible through air (as has been shown to occur between pigs & monkeys).  It is suggested we need an immediate  “take charge” entity, namely, the United Nations to step up and manage the Ebola crisis.  Read about proposed management strategies and why waiting for R&D of effective drug therapies is not the answer at this moment here.

Starbucks Challenge Returns!

Once a month.  Take the Challenge.

Each month we present one or more technologies with potential legal implications.

What’s YOUR answer?

One $25 Starbucks gift card card awarded per challenge based on what we feel is the most judicious response to the presented technologies. Click on “Leave a reply” to post your answer(s).  Deadline to be eligible for this month’s Starbucks gift card is October 1, 2014.

The Economist’s excellent Technology Quarterly published this week includes a story about George Church, a keynote speaker at our Center’s 2013 Governance of Emerging Technologies conference.  Read about Church and his many fascinating projects applying genetics and synthetic biology here.  The person who highlights and discusses the most interesting legal issue arising from the technologies Church considers will receive the coveted $25 Starbucks gift card.

Troy Rule Authors New Book on Renewable Energy Development

Troy Rule, Professor of Law and Faculty Fellow of ASU’s Center for Law, Science & Innovation, has a new book coming out next month under the title, Solar, Wind and Land: Conflicts in Renewable Energy Development, published by Routledge.  Read a synopsis below. 51mxQLsHn0L

The global demand for clean, renewable energy has rapidly expanded in recent years and will likely continue to escalate in the decades to come. Wind and solar energy systems often require large quantities of land and airspace, so their growing presence is generating a diverse array of new and challenging land use conflicts. Wind turbines can create noise, disrupt views or radar systems, and threaten bird populations. Solar energy projects can cause glare effects, impact pristine wilderness areas, and deplete water resources. Developers must successfully navigate through these and myriad other land use conflicts to complete any renewable energy project. Policymakers are increasingly confronted with disputes over these issues and are searching for rules to effectively govern them. Tailoring innovative policies to address the unique conflicts that arise in the context of renewable energy development is crucial to ensuring that the law facilitates rather than impedes the continued growth of this important industry.

This book describes and analyses the property and land use policy questions that most commonly arise in renewable energy development. Although it focuses primarily on issues that have arisen within the United States, the book’s discussions of international policy differences and critiques of existing approaches make it a valuable resource for anyone exploring these issues in a professional setting anywhere in the world.