GETS Call For Abstracts

                                             Join us!
                                    May 27 and 28, 2020

The Center for Law, Science and Innovation is currently looking for abstracts for the Eighth Annual Conference on Governance of Emerging Technologies and Science (GETS.) This conference will consist of plenary and session presentations and discussions on the regulatory, governance, legal, policy, social and ethical aspects of emerging technologies.

These emerging technologies include:

National Security

Autonomous Vehicles

Synthetic Biology

Biotechnology

Autonomous Weapons Systems

Digital Health

Virtual Reality

Nanotechnology 

3D Printing 

Gene Editing 

Genomics 

Personalized Medicine 

Human Enhancement 

Blockchain 

Quantum Computing 

Robotics 

Artificial Intelligent 

Internet of Things 

Neuroscience

Telemedicine 

We are currently accepting abstracts for proposed presentations. Those submitting abstracts need not provide a written paper, although provision will be made for posting and possible post-conference publication of papers for those who are interested.
Abstracts are invited for any aspect or topic relating to the governance of emerging technologies, including any of the technologies listed above.

Deadline to Submit Abstracts: Friday, January 31, 2020

Abstracts should not exceed 500 words and must contain your name and email address. The sponsors will pay for the conference registration (including all conference meals and events) for one presenter for each accepted abstract. In addition, we will have limited funds available for travel subsidies (application included in submission form).

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IPKat Names Patent Remedies and Complex Products the Best Patent Law Book of 2019

The teaching aid blog for Intellectual Property Law, IPKat has named the Patent Remedies and Complex Products the Best Patent Law Book of 2019, over 3 other books in the category. Through a collaboration of twenty legal scholars in eleven countries, Patent Remedies and Complex Products provides a consensus on the use of these remedies for products such as smartphones, computer networks and the Internet of Things.  

The Law Science and Innovation center has worked on Patent Remedies and Complex Products as a project for several months and released it in 2019. The book covers the application of monetary remedies, as well as injunctive relief and also explores the effect of competition laws and agreements to license standards-essential patents on terms that are ‘fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory’ on patent remedies. 

Find the book here.

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Marchant Presents on Liability in Clinical Genomics at Columbia

Faculty Director Gary Marchant spoke at the Seminar on Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Genetics last month. He elaborated on the question “Can Liability Improve Clinical Genomics?” 

One of the major roadblocks to the success of clinical genomics has been identified as the failure of healthcare providers to utilize genomics. Marchant’s presentation critically evaluated whether medical malpractice liability could improve the appropriate and accurate uses of genomics by providers. His presentation discussed the frequency of legal errors in clinical genomics, the impact of potential liability on behavior change and deterrence, potential adverse side effects of litigation and more. 

Other presentations for this Seminar will be held in the coming months, with speakers from the Hastings Center, UPenn, UCLA and Bard College. 

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Bowman quoted in Phoenix Business Journal on Smart Cities

Diana Bowman was recently quoted in a Phoenix Business Journal article about Smart Cities. The article, “Greater Phoenix Cities Lead the Way,” discusses the implementation of smart city technology and the challenges that could arise. Bowman is quoted discussing the aspects of the smart city evolution and how jurisdiction comes into play.  She offers some examples of designing infrastructure that supports autonomous vehicles to promote independence in an aging population, or how access to the internet opens up job opportunities and could educate young children. To her, infrastructure is critical to the growth of smart cities, saying, “I would argue that the infrastructure should be viewed as the enabler for the delivery of services and opportunities that will drive quality-of-life improvement and promote, for example, sustainability.”

Bowman is also quoted discussing the Greater Phoenix region’s efforts in implementing smart city technology, also how each challenge that our area is facing, impacts all of its residents. Bowman says, “In my view, recognizing that we can scale solutions quickly by working collaboratively has been one of the key drivers behind the cities, towns and county supporting The Connective.” The Connective is a new disciplined way of adopting smart technology and advancing the digital framework. Bowman discusses The Connective, saying “Our approach with The Connective is that everyone in the region should be involved; a regional initiative needs to have everyone at the table — big or small, in terms of cities and towns — so that we are able to co-design what the vision of the region is. Key challenges facing the Greater Phoenix region — from transportation through to sustainability, for example — impact us all.” 

As for implementation, Bowman believes that interoperability is key to a smarty city or smart region and has been a driving force behind The Connective, saying, “Interoperability recognizes that people move across jurisdictional boundaries all day, every day,” she says, “and having systems — albeit parking or traffic signals — that talk to each other allows for the streamlining of operations and greater efficiencies across the board.”

To learn more about the challenges, and impact on business growth that smart cities could bring to the Phoenix area, as well as what other industry leaders are saying about this technology, check out the article here.

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Faculty Director Gary Marchant to speak on Clinical Genomics at Columbia

Gary Marchant will speak at the Columbia University Center for Science and Society mid-December discussing how liability could possibly improve clinical genomics.

Marchant’s presentation will critically evaluate whether medical malpractice liability can improve the appropriate and accurate use of genomics by providers.

Check out more about this presentation here.

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Phase Two Report on Reducing Fuel Consumption Co-Authored by Marchant Released

The National Academies of Sciences Engineering Medicine released the final report on Reducing Fuel Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles. This report was co-authored by Faculty Director Gary Marchant. 

Medium and Heavy Duty trucks are a common way of transportation in every sector of the economy, and the report explores the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emission legislative and regulatory action in the past few years as well as various ways to reduce the consumption of fuel and release of greenhouse gases.

Check out the report here.

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Bowman, Maynard, Tournas and Johnson Release Gene-Editing Article on Slate

Diana Bowman, Andrew Maynard Walter Johnson, and Lucille Tournas co-released an article on gene-edited athletes this week. The article, appearing on Slate, discusses the new technologies that help athletes push boundaries and physical limits. The controversial CRISPR method has been employed to help design future athletes before they are even born. It is believed that within the next few years, children whose genomes have been altered could be born and feasibly be of age to compete in the 2040 Olympics.

Gene-editing technology is developing very quickly, with scientists fighting to test gene-editing in humans despite the global memoritorim put on such testing. Athletes trying to find a genetic edge from their opponents is not a new concept, with the 2008 Summer Olympics being an example. Shortly before the competition, a scientist known for gene therapy research was contacted multiple times a day from athletes who were going to compete. The technology was largely untested and could have been unsafe.

In 2018 China announced that they would use athletes’ genomes as a factor when considering their eligibility for the 2022 Winter Olympics. In order to avoid genetic cheating, the World Anti- Doping Agency introduced the ban on genetic doping in 2004. This ban may not apply to the future gene-edited athletes who had no say in their genetic modification before birth. 

Read the article and learn more about genetic doping here.

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Register Now: The Future of Governing the Internet

The Center for Law Science and Innovation will be co-sponsoring an event on Technology in the Public Interest, featuring author Harold Feld. Feld is the Senior Vice President for Public Knowledge, one of the nation’s premier consumer advocacy organizations.  Feld wrote The Case for the Digital Platform Act: Breakups, Starfish Problems and Tech Regulation, which aims to guide policymakers on what government can do to preserve competition and empower individual users in “Big Tech.”
This book explores how to address the challenges posed by the power of digital platforms. Feld will lead a community dialogue on the intersection of copyright, telecommunications and the internet. 

This event will discuss the impact of Big Tech on our lives today, and will be held at the historic Grace Court School.

Register here.

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Marchant and Stevens to Speak at Biosecurity Workshop

Gary Marchant and Yvonne Stevens are set to speak at a biosecurity workshop in early December. The workshop, held Dec. 5th -6th,  aims to foster awareness and create a conversation about the ethical, moral and social implications of biotechnologies and the risk they could bring to the environment, as well as public safety.

Topics this workshop will cover include:

  • Emergence of synthetic viruses
  • DIY biology
  • International collaborations and disaster preparedness
  • The ethical standards in biotechnology
  • Future biological security

Discussions will be led by biosecurity practitioners, and will include Special Agents from the FBI headquarters and the FBI Phoenix weapons of Mass Destruction unit. Discussions will center around the ethical, legal and social implications of emerging biotechnologies and the importance of biosecurity. 2.0 CE points are available for attending the workshop, and there is no cost to participate.

RSVP here.

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Moving Beyond Animals: a Seminar on Non-Animal Research Methods

Amy Shelton of Shamar Advisors and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine will be hosting an event focusing on non-animal research methods and human-relevant research techniques. Starting January 31, various expert speakers will present on the non-animal research methods used in their specific industry. Due to the advances in 3D and in vitro modeling, there have been great improvements in human disease modeling, drug development, toxicology testing and more. With the advancements, scientists are now integrating human-relevant methods into research to produce more reliable results. This is by using tissues-on-chips, 3D bioprinting, organoids as well as other in vitro and in silico models. 

Kicking off the seminar will be a discussion on moving beyond animals with microphysiological systems and 3D Bioprinting, with speakers from Nortis Bio, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard. Topics for the rest of the seminar include re-evaluating the use of animal research for  bioengineering, in vitro and silico toxicity testing, as well as neuroscience and infectious diseases. Each event will be held at the end of the month until April. 

The events are open to all audiences, you can register here

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